Broadheath House History

History of Broadheath House Gardens

Broadheath is a small Georgian manor house of about 1750, possibly a remodelling of an earlier house. It has two storeys and is rendered with central ogee window in a pediment. In about 1925 Clough Williams-Ellis extended the house to the west constructing a circular single-storey Italianate dairy and store area. The gardens lie to the north, north-east and south of the house.

The house is set back to the south of the B 4362, partly hidden behind a high yew hedge. The surrounding land is flat, being the flood plain of the River Lugg that lies to the north. Extensive, open views can be taken to the north towards the hills above Presteigne. To the south of the site level fields run to the Hindwell Brook, south of which the ground rises steeply into heavily wooded hills.

The present owners have lived at Broadheath for about ten years. Prior to this the house was owned by a doctor who was a keen gardener and is credited with conserving the layout of the Williams-Ellis garden as well as planting many of the flowering shrubs that are presently on site. The carriage house is a two-storey stone building dating to c. 1750, contemporary with the house. It lies on a north-south line, which also forms the western garden boundary. The old Head Gardener's cottage lies at the southernmost end. The northern end of the building was the stable and carriage house. It is now the garage and a general store. Wooden garage doors are on the western side of the building alongside which there is an old water pump.

The stable is connected to the house by a capped, stone boundary wall on the east side of which, within the garden, there are ornamental additions by Williams-Ellis. A raised stone terrace runs along the east face of the wall about 2m above the ground. The north face of the stables are similarly embellished by a high stone buttress and a flight of stone steps on the western end which lead up to a wooden door on the upper storey. Originally this was staff accommodation; it is now used for storage and as a summer house.

The Coates
The Coates
The Coates
The Coates