Broadheath House History

Two acres of formal landscaped gardens, originally designed by Sir Clough Williams Ellis in 1925.

The barn/loggia is the focus of the garden. As part of his design for the garden Williams-Ellis bought in a timber- framed barn of unknown date in c. 1925, to link the house to the existing barns on the east of the garden site. The south wall of the barn was removed, the interior plastered and the floor paved with stone random paving, creating a stylish garden room or loggia.

Enclosing the garden on the east is a range of timber barns dating from about 1850, which are original to the site. The barns face east - there are no window openings on to the garden. From the garden a doorway in the north-west corner of the barns links the garden to the kitchen garden beyond. The barns are now used for storage and the southern barn still contains a potting bench. A small range of modern stables creates the barn's northern boundary.

On the western face of the barns there are four, mature espalier pear trees. In between the middle two trees there is a large, triangular dovecote attached to the side of the building.

The garden surrounds the house on the south, east and north-east. It covers an area of approximately 3 acres. It falls into two main areas to the south and north of the house. The south front of the house opens out on to a broad, curved, crazy paved stone terrace, which runs along its length, on to an area of lawn beyond. This area is enclosed on the south-west by the carriage house. Immediately below the connecting loggia there is a sophisticated Arts & Crafts stone paved, rectangular sunk garden, approximately 10 x 30m. This is connected to the loggia, the eastern barn and the western lawn, which all enclose it, by two sets of stone steps.

Six symmetrical flower beds, two square, four rectangular, are arranged within the sunk garden. The northern most two, the square beds, have been converted into fish ponds; the other beds are planted up with roses. A pair of narrow mixed borders run along the west and east sides of the sunk garden. In the centre of the rectangular beds there is a sundial on a stone base.

The eastern barn extends for about 15m down the length of the sunk garden. A 2m high stone wall, supported by stone buttresses, continues along the remaining length of the garden. This connects to a south cross wall, the southern boundary of the sunk garden. The stone cross wall is about 2m high and is coped with red brick.

The Coates
The Coates
The Coates
The Coates